Kentucky tax fraud, worker misclassification

House Bill 397 Good for Kentucky Workers

We need your help to protect working families like yours. The Kentucky State House is considering House Bill 397, which penalizes commercial contractors caught cheating on bid day by treating employees as subcontractors. It levels the playing field so law-abiding contractors can keep you working. Kentucky residents, call your State Representative at 1-800-372-7181 & tell them to support HB 397.

 

Prevailing Wage Protects Kentucky’s Taxpayers

Construction workers in Kentucky contribute $20 million to state and local taxes. This allows policy makers to balance budgets and fund infrastructure and public safety without raising taxes on everyone else.

However, workers NOT paid prevailing wage are eligible for up to $8,000 in public assistance, which costs taxpayers for additional reliance on cash assistance, food stamps and unpaid visits to the emergency room. Taxpayers don’t save without prevailing wage, they SUBSIDIZE low-wage jobs.

Prevailing wage is the wage paid to skilled construction workers on publicly funded projects estimated to cost more than $250,000. The wages are set by Kentucky’s Labor Cabinet based on what construction workers in the area make on private sector projects. This forces big government to abide by local private sector economies.

[i]  Kentucky’s Prevailing Wage Law, an Economic Impact Analysis, Peter Philips, Ph.D., 2014.
[ii]  Economic Policy Brief, Working Partnerships USA, 2011.

Prevailing Wage Drives Kentucky’s Economic Development

Every dollar spent on a prevailing wage project generates $1.50 in economic activity – that’s money spent at local businesses such as restaurants, shops and grocery stores – spurring additional job creation that keeps local businesses and economies strong.

In fact, the economic activity generated by prevailing wage projects supports 2,643 non-construction jobs in Kentucky!

Prevailing wage is the wage paid to skilled construction workers on publicly funded projects estimated to cost more than $250,000. The wages are set by Kentucky’s Labor Cabinet based on what construction workers in the area make on private sector projects. This forces big government to abide by local private sector economies.