Carpenters help with medical bills after tragic car accident

Carpenters Help Family Recover After Head-On Collision

On a foggy Thursday morning in April, Adam Stampley boarded a flight from Indianapolis to Las Vegas. He took his seat and smiled. This was a huge moment in his career with the United Brotherhood of Carpenters, a culmination of three years of hard work and dedication.

Union officers selected Adam to attend the Journeyman Leadership Program at the Carpenters International Training Center, a recognition of his leadership potential and dedication to the brotherhood. “Everything is coming together,” he thought as he glanced at his phone hoping to hear from his wife Erica before the flight.

It was odd he hadn’t heard from her yet, despite repeated calls and texts. His wife and two kids dropped him off at the airport less than two hours before. As the plane taxied slowly down the runway, Adam was relieved when he felt his phone vibrate and he saw Erica’s name on the screen.

That relief was short-lived. It didn’t take long before Adam registered what the man on Erica’s phone was saying.

“Your family was in a head-on collision with a semi, you need to get here immediately,” a police officer said.

The moments that followed were some of the worst of Adam’s life. The officer said his wife and daughter may not survive. The flight crew couldn’t stop the plane. He had only a minute or two to make a call before his phone lost signal. So, Adam called a friend, lost signal, then sat on a flight for four grueling hours, wondering if he still had a family to go home to.

 

Union Helps Family After Tragic Accident

The Stampley’s vehicle after a head-on collision with a semi nearly killed three members of the family. (Photo provided by Adam Stampley)

 

The Aftermath

When the flight landed, Adam got an update from the hospital. One of Erica’s kidneys was destroyed in the accident, the other was failing. She was bleeding internally. Her femur was broken in half. She’d died and been revived three times already. Doctors gave her less than a five percent chance of living.

His six-year-old daughter Araya was at a different hospital in a coma. Her appendix ruptured, her bladder was punctured, and she’d undergone surgery to repair injuries to four areas of her spine. She would survive, but her dreams of being an Olympic gymnast were over.

Eight-year-old Thomas fared better. He broke three ribs and fractured his finger but remembered the entire accident and was scared.

Carpenters help with medical bills after tragic car accident

6-year-old Araya recovered at Riley Hospital for Children after a serious car accident in 2019.

Miracles

Now in Las Vegas, Adam reached out to Local 133 members Jason King and Greg Tucker. They helped him navigate the airport and get a flight back to Indianapolis. It took a total of twelve hours before Adam saw Erica, and days before he saw the kids.

At the hospital, Erica’s condition was so grave doctors had Adam make two sets of plans: one if she passed away and another if she survived and couldn’t walk. He wouldn’t need either of them.

Despite the odds, Erica survived. Thomas was released two days after the accident, and Araya almost two weeks later. To help with expenses, Locals 133 and 301 took up a collection at their union meeting and on job sites, raising over $2,000 for the family.

With Erica recovering in a rehabilitation hospital and expenses mounting, Adam went back to work for Circle B. Union brothers and sisters donated hours so he could see his wife and still get paid.

“Something like this shows you the meaning of brotherhood. I couldn’t believe how good people were to my family,” Adam Stampley said.

In August, the kids started school. For Thomas, it was nothing new, but Araya was in the first grade and it was her first day of school ever. It was her first day without her mom, in a neck brace, with hair lovingly styled by her dad. “I wouldn’t say we were thriving, but we were surviving,” Adam said, adding that he learned a lot about princesses over the summer too.

Indiana Carpenters Raise Money for Family in Need

Adam Stampley and his children visit the Indiana State Fair where carpenters raised money for his family.

Carpenters Care

Adam smiled for his kids, but he still worried a lot. He worried about Erica, wondered if she’d be able to walk again, about the house, and how to get it ready for her eventual return. He had a lot of things to worry about, thankfully how to pay for the over $3 million dollars in medical bills was not one of them.

“I didn’t have to worry about how much it would cost to save their lives, because that’s what union insurance is all about,” he said.

Thanks to his union benefits, Adam will only owe a fraction of the cost of medical bills, around $10,000. Much to his surprise, his union family stepped in once again to help with that burden. The Stampleys were recipients of money raised for “Carpenters Care”, an annual fundraiser that benefits an IKORCC family or families in serious financial need.

Business representatives, apprentices, and MAC members built and sold raffle tickets for a large playhouse. Members from Ohio and Kentucky joined brothers and sisters from Indiana for a charity ride in Greenwood. Altogether, members raised over $7,000 for the family.

Indiana Carpenters help family recover after car accident

Adam Stampley and his daughter Araya build a toolbox at the Indiana State Fair, where IKORCC members raised money for their family.

Nearly seven months after the accident, Erica was released from the hospital. In October, she walked by Adam’s side as he went from apprentice to journeyman at his IKORCC graduation. Just days before Christmas, she will have what they hope to be her last leg surgery, the 30th one since that fateful April morning.

Adam is looking forward to a brighter 2020.

“When I walked into that hospital room, I fell to my knees,” he said. “I am so thankful to everyone that helped me and my family back up.”

Carpenters help family recover after tragic car accident

Adam & Erica Stampley with EST Todd Pancake at Adam’s apprenticeship graduation in October.

 

 

Cincinnati Carpenters Help Orphans

Locals 2 & 1090 Help Orphans at Christmas

Cincinnati Carpenters Help OrphansThis holiday season Locals 2 and 1090 in Cincinnati made sure no child was left behind. As part of their ongoing partnership with St. Joseph’s Orphanage, IKORCC carpenters and millwrights made sure kids in the home had something to wake up to this Christmas.

The orphanage often gets toy donations for the younger kids but struggles when it comes to making teens’ wishes come true. That’s where IKORCC members stepped in to help. Locals 2 and 1090 donated a total of $1,000 to help.

Items on the teen girl’s wish list included nail polish, art supplies, Bath and Bodyworks lotions, and headphones. The boys asked for sporting equipment, footballs, basketballs, and headphones. This is the third year Cincinnati members have made sure all the kids at St. Joseph’s had something to open.

“A lot of people think orphanages don’t exist anymore or they don’t realize there are still kids in these places. We don’t want them to be forgotten. Most importantly, we want the kids to know people care about them,” said Chris Lamantia, a business representative with the Indiana/Kentucky/Ohio Regional Council of Carpenters.

In 2019, Cincinnati-area members have taken St. Joseph’s kids to see the Cincinnati Reds, to Kings Island, and invited them to their annual summer picnic.

St. Joseph’s Orphanage serves children and families in 10 counties across Southwest Ohio and operates offices in Cincinnati (Hamilton County), Dayton (Montgomery County), and Fairfield (Butler County). Since their founding 190 years ago, they remain dedicated to building hope and strengthening lives as they support children and families on their journey to hope and healing. St. Joseph’s provides comprehensive behavioral health and educational treatment services to more than 4,300 children and families each year, many of whom have experienced neglect, abuse, or other forms of trauma. To learn more visit www.stjosephorphanage.org.

Sisters Gather Donations for Local Foster Home

Local 175 and Industrial Local 2501 out of Louisville are working together to gather donations for an area foster home. Uspiritus is a foster home working to “provide greater care for vulnerable children and families throughout the Commonwealth of Kentucky”.

The Local Sisters are combining efforts to collect daily necessities and a Christmas list to support the foster home.  Local 175 SIS Chair Amanda Wigge and Co-Chair Meah Jessup and Local 2501 SIB Chair Shannon Porter and Elaine Osorio visited Target to set up a registry for the charity drive.

“It’s all about giving back to the community or those in need – letting them know that we’re here for them”, Shannon Porter told IKORCC about setting up this drive.

Local Sisters shopping for donations.

Some everyday items in need include:

  • Toilet paper
  • Clorox wipes
  • Deodorant
  • Shampoo
  • Body wash
  • Twin sheet sets
  • Diapers
  • Socks
  • Boxers
  • Birthday candles

The Christmas wish list includes gifts such as:

  • Action figures
  • Hot wheels
  • Legos
  • Batteries
  • Bath body sets
  • Gas gift cards
  • Watches
  • Comic books
  • Posters

If you would like to help support these efforts, you can visit: http://www.target.com/gift-registry/gift/SIBS1752501. You can ship donations to the Louisville Training Center at 1245 Durrett Lane, Louisville, KY 40213. 

The last day to donate through this IKORCC charity drive will be December 9th, 2019.

Learn more about Uspiritus here: http://uspiritus.org/about/history-mission/.

Local Sisters setting up target charity registry.

carpenters, community, union

Boys & Girls Club & IKORCC Launch Project Blueprint

carpenters, community, union

IKORCC Business Rep Kyle Gresham works with students at the launch of Project Blueprint in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

When the Boys & Girls Club of Fort Wayne began their quest for a blueprint for great futures for their students, we knew it was a perfect project for the Indiana/Kentucky/Ohio Regional Council of Carpenters.

Not only did union carpenters help build the new Boys & Girls Club in Fort Wayne, Indiana, we’ve also helped plan, build & introduce curriculum for a one-of-a-kind program called Project Blueprint.

Project Blueprint exposes kids to careers in skilled trades like carpentry, flooring, welding, electric, manufacturing and more. The idea is to show kids career options after high school other than the traditional four-year college pathway.

“That’s the key, exposing kids to careers early on so they can really dream about what is that they really like doing. This is what this program is all about,” says Boys and Girls Club of Fort Wayne CEO Joe Jordan.

Project Blueprint is the first of its kind in the country. Kids utilize the curriculum and learn to plan, layout, and build structures. A special room in the new Boys & Girls Club will make it easier for students to focus on their projects. The Project Blueprint room features workstations, tools, welding and more.

IKORCC Business Representative Kyle Gresham says, “From its very inception, we’ve been involved. From serving on the advisory board, helping create a curriculum, to working on projects with students.”

“It really recharges me to see how excited these young people are to try something new and realize that they can do anything they set their mind to,” Kyle adds.

Community partners are also excited for the project, on Tuesday night the Boys & Girls Club received over $200,000 in donations for materials to keep the project moving.

Signatory union contractors MKS (Michael Kinder & Sons) built the Boys & Girls Club of Fort Wayne with interior work by Rosema.

 

 

 

 

Louisville Carpenters Help Homeless Vets

The Indiana Kentucky Ohio Regional Council of Carpenters (IKORCC) Membership Action Committee of Carpenters Local 175 Louisville, KY hung drywall in a home slated to be donated to a homeless Louisville veteran. This is one of three homes Kentucky Carpenters have helped renovate to help homeless veterans.

The project is a part of Operation Victory, affiliated with the Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs. IKORCC contractors and suppliers graciously donated the drywall, screws, mud, tape, misc supplies, and even the finishing to make the project a success. Over a dozen members and their families came out to volunteer their time, knowledge and tools to help give this veteran a safe place and a fresh start.

“Our local has a lot of veterans and Helmets to Hardhats members. They put their lives on the line to protect us while serving, they should have a place to sleep when they get back home. It’s why our local is a proud partner in remodeling this home,” says Local 175 member and IKORCC business representative Noah Grimes.

Operation Victory is a coalition of Greater Louisville Area Unions, Non-Profit/Community Organizations, and Local Area Businesses joined together to rehabilitate vacant and abandoned homes for a Homeless Louisville Veteran. Veteran homelessness is an issue that is important to the Indiana Kentucky Ohio Regional Council of Carpenters because veterans put their lives on the line to protect us, and we believe they should have a home to come back to. The Operation Victory coalition plans to help at least four more homeless veterans this year with some help from area businesses and the IKORCC.

Special thanks to all who helped the veteran get back on his feet, including: Tony Dobson, Shea Dobson, Ron Gibson, Andrew Kayla Faulkner, Robert Johnson, Kelly Davis, Gleen Koenig, Stephen Sites, Ben Ganote, Ben’s son Angelo Moore, Mike Blevins, Thomas Hacker, Quality Interiors, L&W Supply Louisville, and Intex Systems.